Logo

Description automatically generated with medium confidence 

 

A close-up of a wording on a red background

Description automatically generated with low confidence

 

 

A picture containing text, clipart

Description automatically generated

 

ARCHIVES

ADVERTISE

CONTACT

 

 

A yellow poster with text and orange fruit

Description automatically generated

Logo, company name

Description automatically generated

A person wearing glasses and a red sweater

Description automatically generated with low confidence

Logo, company name

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

 

 

Text

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

 

 

 

Lowville DPW Superintendent Cites Safety Concerns as Approximately a Dozen Trees Removed Along State Street in Downtown

 

Published: May 01, 2024 at 07:30 p.m.

By: Nick Altmire

 

A car on the street

Description automatically generated

Approximately a dozen trees lining the downtown section of South State Street in the Village of Lowville

are being removed by DPW crews due to safety concerns.

 

Lowville, NY- Village Department of Public Works (DPW) crews began the process of removing approximately a dozen trees along South State Street in the village’s downtown this morning, coming as a surprise to many of the downtown businesses and residents.

 

Crews were out early this morning to start the work, delimbing the trees and removing the debris. Over the coming days the work will continue with the removal of the remaining trunks and stumps. Crews will then replace the trees with large potted flowers and some new trees that may be a better fit for the downtown section of the village.

 

The removed trees are along both sides of South State Street in the core of downtown, between the shoulder of the road and the sidewalk, from the Dayan Street/Shady Avenue intersection to just north of Elm Street. They were planted in 2015 after the completion of a NYS DOT project that widened the intersection on Dayan Street.

 

There was quite the buzz in the village throughout the morning, both from the sounds of the chainsaws and the reaction from residents, businesses, and those who work in the village. Most of the people I spoke with didn’t want to be quoted or identified, but the consensus seemed to feel that the trees provided a nice aesthetic to downtown and were surprised to see them being removed.

 

“The bottom line is that these trees were becoming a safety hazard and getting too large for the downtown section of the village,” DPW Superintendent Paul Denise said. “As a village we have a responsibility, not only to the business owners, but the traveling public as well. The trees in question were blocking road signs, impeding pedestrian traffic on sidewalks, in addition to other issues.”

 

A majority of the trees were diseased or had issues in the root systems from the amount of salt used by the State along the street during the winter months, according to Mr. Denise.

 

Mr. Denise said that he understands “people are up in arms about this” but asks residents and businesses to be patient as the Village implements its vision for the downtown section.

 

“Moving forward there will be flowering pots installed and every other space will have a tree that will be smaller and blossom for more than a few weeks each year,” Mr. Denise explained. “I am currently working with a landscaping company to identify a tree that will withstand all of the elements here and not become as large and overgrown as the existing trees.”

 

The trees were becoming so large that the roots were starting to become an issue to sidewalks, which can be lifted in sections as the root system expands. By removing the trees now, this problem can be avoided in a proactive manner, Mr. Denise said.

 

One business owner I spoke with was Brandon Hellinger. He and his wife Meghann own three businesses in this section of downtown- The Bateman Draft House, Drift Day Spa, and Munch. Much of what I heard from Mr. Hellinger was similar to what I was hearing from others who didn’t want to speak on the record.

 

“While I understand the necessity for signs to be visible and easily read, I believe that when a decision is being made that impacts downtown businesses as a whole like this, some prior notification from the Village would be appreciated,” Mr. Hellinger said.

 

Others had the same sentiment, noting some advanced notice that this would be happening and what the plan going forward was may have alleviated some of their questions and/or concerns.

 

Mr. Hellinger said he did like the aesthetic the trees provided to downtown and was happy to learn that the Village intends to replace some of the removed trees with a smaller, less intrusive tree. One of the removed trees was directly in front of Munch., and helped block some of the afternoon sun from beating through the front window, Mr. Hellinger pointed out as we spoke at the eatery, adding that he will definitely miss that aspect.

 

Mr. Denise said that once crews complete the project in the coming weeks, residents and businesses should have a final result that will help fulfill the Village’s vision for a beautified and inviting downtown section.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Text

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2022 linkinglewiscounty.com