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Tug Hill Commission to Host Winter Wildlife Webinar Series Part 2: Marten on February 20

 

Published: January 30, 2024 at 10:30 a.m.

By: Press Release from NYS Tug Hill Commission

 

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Winter Wildlife Webinar Series Part 2: Marten – February 20, 2024

 

WATERTOWN, NEW YORK – The Tug Hill Commission will host the second of four virtual Winter Wildlife Webinars on Tuesday, February 20, 2024 at 6 p.m. This webinar will spotlight the American martens (Martes americana), in collaboration with NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Regional Wildlife Program Manager Paul Jensen, who will share results of recent research on martens and discuss the potential for martens to recolonize the Tug Hill region. He will also overview the Adirondack Inventory & Monitoring (AIM) Network – a collaborative survey effort involving the deployment of camera traps by several regional partners in northern New York, to assist in understanding of marten and other wildlife populations in this region, including the use of important landscape linkages between the Adirondacks and Tug Hill. Registration is required and available at tinyurl.com/TugHillMarten. A Zoom link will be sent via a registration confirmation email.

 

Paul Jensen is the regional wildlife program manager with the NYSDEC Division of Fish and Wildlife in Region 5, where he directs research, survey, and land management projects in the Adirondacks and Lake Champlain basin. Previously, he was the furbearer biologist for the region for 14 years where his research focused on the ecology and management of American martens and fishers. Prior to joining NYSDEC in 2003, he worked in Alaska where he was involved with long-term monitoring of caribou and waterfowl populations on the Arctic Coastal Plain and conducted research with the New York Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Cornell University. Paul is currently an adjunct faculty in the Department of Environmental Biology at the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry and a Research Fellow with the Natural Sciences Department at Paul Smith’s College. Paul received his B.S. in Environmental and Forest Biology from SUNY ESF, M.S. in Wildlife Ecology from the University of New Hampshire, and Ph.D. in Wildlife Biology from McGill University.

 

 

 

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